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Curriculum Linkages to KS3 History


 The Abolition Project links to the National Curriculum KS3 History Programmes of Study and QCA Schemes of Work

HISTORY KS3

 

Chronological understanding

 

1) Pupils should be taught to recognise and make appropriate use of dates, vocabulary and conventions that describe historical periods and the passing of time.

This is achieved by use of the Timeline within the website.

Knowledge and understanding of events, people and changes in the past

 

2) Pupils should be taught

 

  • a. to describe and analyse the relationships between the characteristic features of the periods and societies studied including the experiences and range of ideas, beliefs and attitudes of men, women and children in the past

The site explores:

 the significance of events, people and changes in relation to the abolition of slavery;

the beliefs and attitudes of the people involved on both sides of the debate;

the experiences of men, women and children involved in slavery - as slaves, slavers and masters - and in the abolition campaigns;

an historical period in which slavery was a characteristic feature of society.

The site encourages students to consider ideas, feelings, values, attitudes of others in relation to a situation very different from that encountered by most of them.

 

  • b. about the social, cultural, religious and ethnic diversity of the societies studied, both in Britain and the wider world in Britain and the wider world

The site explores one contributory factor to modern Britain's diversity.

The site encourages students to consider ideas, feelings, values, attitudes of others in relation to a situation very different from that encountered by most of them.

By investigating an historical situation where widespread lack of respect for, and indifference to, the experiences of peoples of different cultures, ethnicity and regions was being challenged, students are prompted to consider these issues in relation to modern society.

This should encourage students to consider the whole issue of respect for differences generally.

By investigating an historical situation where one geographical and cultural group of people treated another such group in a deeply exploitative way, students should be encouraged to reflect on modern issues facing today's global community.

 

  • c. to analyse and explain the reasons for, and results of, the historical events, situations and changes in the periods studied

 

The site looks at the significance of events people and changes; at change that took place; at the reasons for these changes, and their results.

The site encourages students to make informed judgements / decisions, and to give reasons for opinions / actions of the people involved.

Students are invited to identify and analyse the relationships between the different events and changes involved in the abolition of slavery.

 

  • d. to identify trends, both within and across different periods, and links between local, British, European and world history

Students investigate the links between the different historical societies bound together by the Atlantic Slave Trade, and trends in British society which challenged it.

This investigation highlights key change taking place within those societies, which in turn relies upon an understanding of characteristic features within them.

The site guides students into making informed judgements / decisions about these changes, and into identifying and analysing relationships between them.

 

  • e. to consider the significance of the main events, people and changes studied.

The site encourages students to consider the significance of events people and changes, and to give reasons for the opinions or actions of those involved.

Students are encouraged to apply their imagination to a situation quite different from one which most will encounter.

 

Historical interpretation

 

3) Pupils should be taught

 

  • a. how and why historical events, people, situations and changes have been interpreted in different ways

The site makes available resources, in particular the Museum Box, for students to use to make their own arguments and presentations, using sources and data from the site and elsewhere, concerning the abolition of slavery. For example, one of the question asks to what extent the success of the Abolition Movement can be attributed to William Wilberforce.

Tackling such questions should stimulate the students to look at and think about different interpretations of the motives and actions of the people involved, based on the information given in the site. One example of this is the interpretation given about Wilberforce's contribution to the Abolition Movement by his sons, an interpretation that gained a great deal of acceptance at the time.

 

  • b. evaluate the sources used, select and record information relevant to the enquiry and reach conclusions

The Museum Box facility encourages students to collate, analyse and evaluate information / data using ICT; to ask historical questions of the sources; to build an enquiry using the sources; to make informed judgements / decisions based on the sources; to read and synthesise the information in the sources into a coherent narrative or argument.

All this is based on the ability to read, summarise and obtain information.

The teachers' area gives questions which encourage students to examine the information critically.

 

Organisation and communication

 

5) Pupils should be taught to:

 

  • a. recall, prioritise and select historical information

 

The site contains a large amount of information, from a wide variety of sources.

 

The Museum Box facility encourages students to exploit sources, and to develop the information handling skills which go with that.

 

  • b. communicate their knowledge and understanding of history, using a range of techniques, including spoken language, structured narratives, substantiated explanations and the use of ICT.

The site has facilities for students to upload their own video presentations, which encourages the skills of turning raw information into a structured and coherent narrative or argument.

Breadth of study

 

Britain 1750-1900

 

The site covers several strands within this unit. Of course, it specifically addresses the topic The Abolition of Slavery in the British Empire, but also has relevance to the study of the Commonwealth, the Global community, Respecting differences, and the Extension of the Franchise.

 

A world study before 1900

13) A study of some of the significant individuals, events and developments from before the twentieth century

The site has relevance to the following units:

 

Black peoples of the Americas

  

The West African Empires

 

OTHER CURRICULUM AREAS

Linkages can also be made to

Citizenship - see separate document

Geography

Religious Education

English Writing and Speaking

  

 

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